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The money won't matter to your children

Rising AFL footballer Moana Hope revealed on Seven's 'Sunday Night' programme that "growing up the way we grew up and having what we have is something money can't get. And if I explained to you my upbringing you'd probably say I didn't have much. But for us we had something nobody else had and that was like the richest love".

She was a member of a large family growing up in a two bedroom Housing Commission home on the outskirts of Melbourne. Looking back she can see that they did it tough, but they never knew it as a kid.

The truth is that children just don't care about money. What makes their world is the time you spend with them and the emotional availability of having you around.

Moana and her thirteen brothers and sisters also survived the untimely death of her father when she was 14 and they continue to have an abundance of family life. With this many children and such a family orientated culture, her mother will never be lonely in her old age.

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March for Life 2017 images for editorial usage

Media are invited to use these contemporary images which are from the March For Life 2017.  A link for downloading a .jpg file of the full 68Mb high resolution image is located above each photograph.

Woman and baby as the march enters the Speakers' Corner precinct. - link to download full resolution image file

Woman and baby close-up, baby looks nervously at pro-abortion protesters off camera. - link to download full resolution image file

March attendees enter the Speakers' Corner precinct. - link to download full resolution image file

Woman carries sign calling to reject legalisation of gender selection abortions. - link to download full resolution image file

Misc crowd close-up with protest signs. - link to download full resolution image file

Child with "choice kills those without one" sign. - link to download full resolution image file

Detail of front of crowd at Speakers' Corner with Parliament House in background. - link to download full resolution image file

Pregnant woman with "I'm with both" sign in front of police. - link to download full resolution image file

Young women queue to sign the official Parliamentary e-petition against the second Pyne Bill. - link to download full resolution image file

The full crowd jammed in to Speakers' Corner with no room to spare between Parliament House and the Botanical Gardens. - link to download full resolution image file

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Extreme Pyne Legislation Was Not Fit to be Passed

EXTREME LEGISLATION WAS NOT FIT TO BE PASSED

The two Pyne abortion Bills were withdrawn because they were facing certain defeat in Parliament tonight (Wednesday, 1 March).

Decriminalising abortion through the first Pyne Bill Abortion Law Reform (Woman's Right to Choose) Amendment Bill 2016, which would have repealed Sections 224, 225, 226 and 282 of the Queensland Criminal Code, by definition would have left a vacuum, which would have allowed abortion at any stage of pregnancy and for any reason.

It is significant that the Queensland Parliament Health Committee inquiry unanimously recommended in its Report dated 26 August 2016 that the first Bill “not be passed”.

On 17 August, 2016 (before the Health Committee had handed down its report on his first Bill), Mr Pyne moved a second private member’s Bill, the Health (Abortion Law Reform) Amendment Bill 2016. This Bill sought to put some provisions into the Health Act to regulate abortion.

This Bill also was referred to the Health Committee for an inquiry, and the Report which was released on 17 February stated that “the committee was not able to reach agreement on whether or not the [second] Bill should be passed”.

In their Statement of Reservations at the back of the Report on the second Bill, the three LNP members of the committee said: “Has the legislation covering this very sensitive and emotional question been drafted in a manner that should be before a Parliament and is the process in which we are about to engage correct? We have a responsibility to pass clear and unambiguous legislation. We do not believe we are at that stage.”

Neither Pyne Bill was fit to be passed by Parliament, given the Health Committee rejected the first one unanimously and was deadlocked on the second one.

NO EFFECTIVE GESTATIONAL RESTRICTION: 24 WEEK LIMIT IN SECOND BILL WAS A CON JOB

Section 21 of the second Pyne Bill, entitled “Abortion on woman more than 24 weeks pregnant”, gave the impression that there would be an effective gestational restriction on late-term abortions. This is not the case, as is evidenced by this note at the end of the section:

“Note—
A failure by a doctor to comply with this section does not constitute an offence but may constitute behaviour
for which action may be taken under the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law (Queensland), Part 8 or the Health Ombudsman Act 2013” (emphasis added).”

In other words, it would not have been a crime for a doctor to kill a viable unborn baby. If the doctor ignored this provision, he or she would have received no penalty other than potentially a slap on the wrist by a disciplinary body. A law without consequences is no law at all.

So this provision was just a con job to trick the public into thinking the legislation would protect viable babies. It wa window dressing to pretty up the first extreme Pyne Bill.

In any case, the requirement that abortions after 24 weeks had to be approved by two doctors was just a sham and a façade, as the second doctor was not required to see or speak to the patient, or even look at her file. Also, the second doctor did not have to be independent, so in the event that a late-term abortion took place in a private hospital or clinic it could be that the two doctors who would profit from the procedure would have approved the late-term abortion – an obvious conflict of interest.

In the absence of an effective and enforceable gestational restriction such as the provisions in the failed Infant Viability Bill 2015 in Victoria, there is no question that the Pyne Bills would have legalised abortion up to birth and at any stage of pregnancy.

ABORTION FOR ANY REASON INCLUDES GENDER SELECTION

The price of endorsing decriminalisation of abortion is that one ends up supporting abortion for reasons that almost every Queenslander would find abhorrent, such as gender selection.

The inconvenient truth is that abortion for any reason means legalising the killing of unborn baby girls, just because they are female.

There is evidence that gender selection abortions do occur in Australia, provided by a demographic study using ABS data from 2003 to 2013 showing “1,395 missing girls”, which was reported by SBS and Daily Mail Australia in 2015.

Also, in 2013 Dr Mark Hobart of Melbourne faced disciplinary charges for refusing to refer a couple for a sex selection abortion in Victoria.

There is no question that the Pyne Bills would have legalised abortion for any reason before 24 weeks of pregnancy.

The second Pyne Bill said that after 24 weeks, a doctor must believe “that the continuation of the woman’s pregnancy would involve greater risk of injury to the physical or mental health of the woman than if the pregnancy were terminated.” This would be a highly contentious and subjective judgment which could not be challenged.

It was also a greatly watered-down test compared with the current law, which allows abortion only if it is “necessary to preserve the woman from a serious danger to her life or physical or mental health (not being merely the normal dangers of pregnancy and childbirth) which the continuance of pregnancy would entail”.

It would have been easy for a doctor to justify an abortion for any reason after 24 weeks if Pyne’s second Bill had been passed. In any case, the current 24 week rule may as well not have been there, given it would not have been an offense if it were disregarded.

PYNE BILLS WOULD HAVE EXPANDED LATE-TERM ABORTION AND DESTROYED THE HEALTH CULTURE OF PUBLIC HOSPITALS

The Queensland Parliament Health Committee inquiry heard expert evidence from Queensland Health that 112 late-term abortions (past 20 weeks of pregnancy) had been performed in public hospitals and 18 in private hospitals or clinics in 2015 – a total of 130. These were abortions which presumably met the current test for a “therapeutic termination”, as opposed to 10,403 abortions for financial or social reasons which private clinics reported that year.

It is significant to note that Victoria, which decriminalised abortion in 2008, reported 358 late-term abortions in 2012-13 (the latest year for which we have figures), exactly half of which were for “psycho-social” reasons (emotional stress caused by factors such as desertion by a partner or financial pressures) and half were for foetal abnormality.

The fact is that if the Pyne Bills had been passed, Queensland public hospitals would have to do abortions for any reason, including late-term abortions for “psycho-social” reasons.

Former director of maternal and foetal medicine at the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, and now an obstetrician in private practice who performs mid-term abortions, Dr Carol Portmann, told the Health Committee inquiry into the first Pyne Bill that in the event of decriminalisation she expected the proportion of all abortions performed by public hospitals to rise from the current 2% to “20 to 25%” of the total.

Over time, decriminalisation would cause Queensland Health to abandon its current “health culture” and replace it with a culture that abortion is “part of routine medical care”, according Dr Portmann.

Inevitably, the overall number of abortions would have increased as a result of this free service, and due to the fact that whenever something is legalised, the incidence of it always rises, as the law plays a role in educating the community regarding moral values (think pokies and brothels).

‘PROTECTED AREAS’ PROVISION WAS UNCONSTITUTIONAL AND WOULD HAVE CRIMINALISED MOTHERS AND PARTNERS

No one supports women being harassed or intimidated, and there are laws in place to prevent this already. However, the second Pyne Bill would have made it an offense to peacefully protest, or perhaps even to pray, within 50 metres of an abortion facility. This abrogation of freedom of speech, expression, movement and religion would have been an affront to democratic rights.

The Parliament is the defender of freedom of speech and religion.

So why would the Parliament have supported legislation that would have seen trained volunteers, peaceful protesters, people praying and those offering informed consent information fined and possibly imprisoned?

The Parliament must reject criminalising citizens who wish to peacefully oppose abortion, while protecting those who carry it out for financial gain.

The second Pyne Bill ironically described proposed no-protest zones around abortion clinics as "protected areas". Of course, there is no protection inside abortion clinics for either mother or baby, as with every abortion, the toll is one dead, one wounded.

The committee heard from a constitutional law expert that Section 24(2)(c) 

“a protest, by any means, during the
protected period for the facility relating to
the performance of abortions in the facility” 

would be unconstitutional.

Furthermore, Cherish Life received independent legal advice that Section 24(2)(b)

“(b) an act that can be seen or heard by a person
during the protected period for the facility, and intended to stop a person from—
(i) entering the facility; or
(ii) having or performing an abortion in the Facility”

effectively would have stopped medical staff in a hospital or clinic where abortions were provided from providing full information and would have silenced them from providing advice to patients other than to proceed with an abortion.

It also would have prohibited anyone in the protected area around a facility from even speaking to a family member to try to talk [her] out of having an abortion. This provision potentially would have criminalised a mother wishing to speak to her daughter to tell her that she will support her in an unexpected pregnancy and encourage her to continue; or a partner, wanting to reassure his wife or girlfriend that he does not want her to abort the baby.

THE BILLS FAILED TO PROVIDE SAFEGUARDS FOR WOMEN

In the Statement of Reservations at the back of the Report on the second Pyne Bill, the three LNP members of the committee also said: “Further, do the Bills deal with all issues that should be dealt with? That is, are there unintended consequences and consequential amendments that will eventually need to be implemented? In short, has there been adequate consideration of all issues?”

Well might this have been asked.

The law on abortion should have safeguards for women and particularly be addressing a woman’s right to know.

The following findings are from the most recent comprehensive market research on abortion in Queensland, a Galaxy opinion poll in May 2016. See What Queenslanders Really Think About Abortion (2016).

Ninety-four percent of Queenslanders believe that before having an abortion, a woman should receive free independent counselling and information on the development of her unborn baby, the nature of the procedure, the physical and psychological risks of the operation and the alternatives of keeping the baby or adoption, so that she can make a fully informed decision.

The Pyne Bills were seriously deficient in that they did not address any of these issues.

This bill should have included a requirement for mandatory independent counselling before abortion, including the provision of an informed consent booklet similar to the one provided to women seeking an abortion in the ACT between 1999 and 2002, which included information on the nature of the procedure, the physical and psychological risks of abortion, the development of the unborn child, alternatives to abortion and support agencies. There also was a mandatory cooling-off period of 72 hours or 3 days.

These requirements co-existed in the ACT Health Act alongside the law in the Crimes Act under which an abortion was legal only if a doctor was satisfied that the woman’s life or physical or mental health was in serious danger from carrying on the pregnancy.

It is of interest to note that the Sunday Mail in Adelaide on 25 July 2004 reported a significant reduction in the number of abortions performed at the Women’s and Children’s Hospital in Adelaide.

In South Australia, the law is that there are no private abortion clinics; it is all done through public hospitals. In 2003, the hospital changed its policy and made independent counselling by social workers mandatory and it led to a drop of 25% in the number of abortions at that hospital over the next 12 months.

There are a lot of unwanted abortions which mandatory independent informed consent counselling could prevent.

Often, there is not free and informed choice by women. There is a lot of coercion by parents, boyfriends, partners or husbands. Women often go into a private abortion clinic which is operating for profit and are not properly or fully counselled, especially about health risks. They are in effect sold an abortion.

As for parental consent, 75% of Queenslanders believe this should normally be required for girls under the age of 16 to have an abortion. Of course, 16 is the age of consent in so far as sexual relations are concerned. It is outrageous that under current case law, Queensland parents have no rights at all in deciding whether their under-age daughters can or should have an abortion. It is totally unacceptable that this has been taken out of the hands of parents. In normal circumstances, they should be involved in the decision-making process on such a major life decision. The statute law needs to be changed to give parents their rights back, so they can protect their daughters from the harm of abortion.

QUEENSLANDERS WERE OPPOSED TO THESE EXTREME BILLS

The most recent comprehensive market research on abortion in Queensland, a Galaxy poll in May 2016, found that 42% of Queensland voters thought the current law was “about right” and 11% thought it was “not restrictive enough” – making 53% who were opposed to making abortion laws more permissive. Furthermore, 85% of Queenslanders are opposed to abortion past 20 weeks of pregnancy, and 72% are opposed to abortion past 13 weeks.

This gold standard research shows that only 6% of Queenslanders support the extreme position proposed by the Pyne Bills, which is abortion for any reason until birth. See What Queenslanders Really Think About Abortion (2016).

We note that Fair Agenda commissioned Essential Research to conduct an opinion poll on Queensland abortion law reform, which was released last week.

The results of the Essential Media poll are flawed because the first question is a leading question which says that “a woman or doctor can be sentenced to jail time”.

While that is technically true, it is not the whole truth – as no woman has ever been convicted, much less jailed, in the 118 years the abortion law has been in place in Queensland.

This is because when prosecutions have been brought against doctors for illegal abortion, the woman has invariably been a witness for the Crown.

To suggest that a woman who has an abortion is at risk of going to jail is false and misleading and calls into question the entire findings of the Essential Research survey.

Furthermore, the Essential Media survey provided respondents with no context around the actual situation with abortion in Queensland, i.e. there are more than 10,000 abortions performed each year under the current law.

This makes the result of the question as to whether “abortion should remain a criminal offense” unreliable.

Besides market research, the largest ever protest rally outside Parliament House with almost 4,000 people after the March for Life on 11 February on one of the hottest days in the year is a strong indication of public opposition to the Pyne Bills.

Also, look at the submissions.

The two Health Committee inquiries into the abortion bills received a combined 2,726 submissions over the two bills on abortion. What is the usual number?

Recent examples:
Domestic Violence: 20 submissions
Rail Safety: 2 submissions
Child Protection: 12 submission Disability Services: 5 Submissions Child Vaccinations: 45
Pyne Abortion Bill no. 1: 1,450
Pyne Abortion Bill no. 2: 1,276
And 83% of these abortion submissions were against the Bills!

And the Petitions.

Two massive petitions totalling 55,604 signatures, with the second one being the biggest Parliamentary e-petition in more than 5 years!

MYTHS LAID TO REST

“Abortion is a normal medical procedure.”

This is nonsense. There is no other medical procedure where one of the individuals concerned dies every time. Abortion is only a medical procedure in the same way that execution by lethal injection is a medical procedure. Indeed that is exactly the way one abortion technique – feticide - is done. Abortion is in the Criminal Code for good reason - because it is the killing of an innocent human being.

“It’s difficult to access an abortion in Queensland.”

With more than 10,000 Medicare-funded surgical abortions and no doubt many thousands of chemical abortion performed each year in 16 Queensland clinics, that is obviously not true.

“Abortion may be necessary in a medical emergency.”

There is no such thing as an “emergency” abortion. Abortion is understood by the public to mean an operation or procedure which has the intention of killing an unborn child.

Thirty-eight years ago, the world’s leading fetologist, Sir William Liley, of New Zealand, who performed the first inter-uterine blood transfusion, said: “The only thing medical about abortion is that doctors do them and must handle the complications afterwards. No matter how bad mother’s heart disease, renal complaint, diabetes or mental illness, no one would be suggesting abortion was essential if mother wanted the baby.” The truth is that abortion is a medical solution to a social problem.

There are some serious threats to a pregnant women’s health that may arise prior to the age of viability, in which a pregnancy may have to be terminated, but these are not abortions in the commonly understood meaning of the word and of course there is no ethical objection to saving the mother’s life.

For example, with an ectopic pregnancy, if nothing is done to remove the embryo lodged in the fallopian tube, the mother may die as well as the baby.

When a pregnant women is diagnosed with cancer of the womb and has to have a hysterectomy, this is also a situation where if nothing is done, both mother and baby may die.

There is certainly never a situation in which a viable unborn baby (i.e. after 23 weeks in Australia) needs to be killed to save the mother’s life.

For example, if the mother has a serious condition such as pre-eclampsia (the symptoms of which include high blood pressure and fluid retention) and the pregnancy needs to be ended, the best way to do this typically is by caesarean section which would result in the health issue being resolved quickly, the mother recovering and her baby being given every chance to survive with the best neo-natal care.

There is no need to put the mother’s health further at risk by the necessary delay involved in performing a late-term abortion through feticide, which involves killing the baby in the womb by an injection of potassium chloride into the heart, and then inducing labor whereby the mother delivers a dead baby several days later.

And there is no need to abort a baby with conditions which are incompatible with life outside the womb (such as anencephaly), as the best and kindest approach for both mother and baby is, not to destroy the baby in the womb, but to allow birth to take place after the normal age of viability and let the mother and other family members cuddle and comfort the baby until he or she dies naturally.

If a mother wants to end a late-term pregnancy, there is no reason why the baby has to be killed in the process. There are plenty of infertile couples who would love to adopt an unwanted baby. There are long adoption waiting lists in Australia, and in 2015 there were only 54 adoptions of Australian-born children to non-relatives. This is due in large measure to the fact that approximately 80,000 unborn children are killed by abortion in this country every year.

“Abortion is safer than childbirth”

There is overwhelming evidence about the serious physical and psychological effects of abortion on women. Most women are not being fully informed of these risks, so they cannot make a free and informed choice.

Physical risks include infection, haemorrhage, infertility and breast cancer. Psychological risks include depression and other mental illness, suicide, drug and alcohol abuse, sexual promiscuity and general poor self-esteem.

A gold standard 30 year longitudinal study on abortion and mental health was published in the British Journal of Psychiatry in 2008 by Fergusson, D. M., Horwood, J.H. and Boden J.M.

A self-described pro-choice atheist and rationalist, Dr David M. Fergusson, Professor of Psychology at the University of Otago in Christchurch, New Zealand, undertook his first investigation with the expectation that his cohort data would prove that the apparent link between abortion and mental health problems would be explained by pre-existing factors. Instead, his data revealed that abortion was an independent "risk factor for the onset of mental illness."

The study found abortion increased the risk of suicide ideation by 61%, the risk of major depression by 31%, the risk of anxiety disorder by 131%, the risk of alcohol dependence by 188% and the risk of illicit drug dependence by 185%.

A most enlightening but disturbing article on the mental health consequences of abortion is Women, Abortion and the Brain, by Professor Evelyn Vitz, of New York University, published in The Public Discourse on 21 September, 2009.

The harm done by abortion to women is brought home by watching videos of the personal stories of Emma and Madeleine at www.abortionrethink.org


For more information, please contact:

Julie Borger
President
Cherish Life Queensland
Email [email protected]
Mobile 0412 692 343

Chris Da Silva
Director of Communications and Marketing
Cherish Life Queensland
Email [email protected]
Mobile: 0433 775 429

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Withdrawal of abortion bills a victory for common sense, women and society

The withdrawal of the Pyne abortion bills today ahead of a scheduled parliamentary debate tomorrow is a win for common sense, women and society, according to Cherish Life Queensland.

“The bills faced certain defeat in Parliament, because they were so flawed,” Cherish Life president Julie Borger said.

“The announcement by the Labor Government that Parliament will not consider abortion legislation again in this term of parliament is a great victory for life and decency.

“A retreat is a defeat.

“Mr Pyne was used by the pro-abortion lobby, who gave him disastrous advice.

Only 6% of Queenslanders support the extreme position of abortion at any stage of pregnancy and for any reason, which these bills would have legalised. 

“These bills totally overlooked safeguards for women such as independent counselling, informed consent, cooling-off periods and parental consent requirements, which the vast majority of Queenslanders support.

“There are a lot of unwanted abortions which mandatory independent informed consent counselling could prevent.

“Often, there is not free and informed choice by women. There is a lot of coercion by parents, boyfriends, partners or husbands.

“Women often go into a private abortion clinic which is operating for profit and are not properly or fully counselled. They are in effect sold an abortion.”

Mrs Borger called on the Government to drop its plan to refer abortion law to the Queensland Law Reform Commission and instead appoint a balanced and representative community advisory panel to review the whole issue.

“This sensitive issue is so important and complex that it demands a proper and balanced review, not just by a group of lawyers, but by a panel of experts from both sides of the debate, drawn from doctors, women’s groups, counselling agencies and advocacy groups, as well as lawyers.”

For more information, please contact:

Julie Borger
President
Cherish Life Queensland
Email [email protected]
Mobile 0412 692 343

Chris Da Silva
Director of Communications and Marketing
Cherish Life Queensland
Email [email protected]
Mobile: 0433 775 429

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Fact check about proposed abortion laws in response to Sunday Mail column

Lauren Martyn-Jones in her column in the Sunday Mail yesterday accused Cherish Life Queensland of conducting a “fear campaign” using “convenient exaggerations” and “corrosive” and “disturbing mistruths” to create a “false perception” about the abortion bills before the Queensland Parliament.

As journalists who “report and interpret honestly, striving for accuracy, fairness and disclosure of all essential… relevant available facts” irrespective of your “personal… belief”, you no doubt would be interested in the following fact check:

Decriminalising abortion through the first Pyne Bill Abortion Law Reform (Woman's Right to Choose) Amendment Bill 2016, which would repeal Sections 224, 225, 226 and 282 of the Queensland Criminal Code, by definition would leave a vacuum, which would allow, as our ads say, abortion “at any stage” and “for any reason”. The Queensland Parliament Health Committee inquiry into the Bill unanimously recommended in its Report dated 26 August 2016 that the Bill not be passed.

On 17 August, 2016 (before the Health Committee had handed down its report on his first Bill), Mr Pyne moved a second private member’s Bill, the Health (Abortion Law Reform) Amendment Bill 2016. This Bill sought to put some provisions into the Health Act to regulate abortion. This Bill also was referred to the Health Committee for an inquiry, and the Report which was released last Friday stated that “the committee was not able to reach agreement on whether or not the Bill should be passed”. It is reasonable to conclude that neither Pyne Bill is fit to be passed by Parliament.

In her article, Ms Martyn-Jones quoted from Section 21 of the second Pyne Bill, entitled “Abortion on woman more than 24 weeks pregnant”, which gives the impression that there would be an effective gestational restriction on late-term abortions. This is not the case. Unfortunately, Ms Martyn-Jones omitted this note at the end of the section:

“Note—
A failure by a doctor to comply with this section does
not constitute an offence but may constitute behaviour
for which action may be taken under the Health
Practitioner Regulation National Law (Queensland),
Part 8 or the Health Ombudsman Act 2013” (emphasis added).

In other words, it would not be a crime for a doctor to kill a viable unborn baby. If the doctor ignored this provision, he or she would receive no penalty other than potentially a slap on the wrist by a disciplinary body. A law without consequences is no law at all.

So this provision is just a con job to trick the public into thinking the legislation would protect viable babies. It is window dressing to pretty up the first extreme Pyne Bill.

In any case, the requirement that abortions after 24 weeks have to be approved by two doctors is just a sham and a facade, as the second doctor is not required to see or speak to the patient, or even look at her file. Also, the second doctor does not have to be independent, so in the event that a late-term abortion took place in a private hospital or clinic it could be that the two doctors who would profit from the procedure would approve the late-term abortion – an obvious conflict of interest.

In the absence of an effective and enforceable gestational restriction such as the provisions in the failed Infant Viability Bill 2015 in Victoria, it is entirely reasonable for Cherish Life ads to state that the Pyne Bills would legalise abortion “up to birth” and “at any stage of pregnancy”.

As for our claim that the Pyne Bills would legalise abortion “for any reason”, there is no question whatsoever about the truth of this statement before 24 weeks of pregnancy.

After 24 weeks, the second Pyne Bill says that a doctor must believe “that the continuation of the woman’s pregnancy would involve greater risk of injury to the physical or mental health of the woman than if the pregnancy were terminated.”

This a greatly watered-down test compared with the current law, which allows abortion only if it is “necessary to preserve the woman from a serious danger to her life or physical or mental health (not being merely the normal dangers of pregnancy and childbirth) which the continuance of pregnancy would entail”.

As many doctors accept the official position of medical professional bodies that “abortion is safer than childbirth”, contrary to the evidence of numerous research studies, it would be very easy for them to justify an abortion “for any reason” if Pyne’s second Bill was passed. In addition, in any case, the current 24 week rule may as well not be there, given it would not be an offense if it were disregarded.

According to the Sunday Mail article, AMA Queensland says that late-term abortions are not a frequent occurrence and… it “does not expect that this would change to a significant degree if this Bill were to be passed by the Parliament”.

The Queensland Parliament Health Committee inquiry heard expert evidence from Queensland Health that 112 late-term abortions (past 20 weeks of pregnancy) had been performed in public hospitals and 18 in private hospitals or clinics in 2015 – a total of 130. These were abortions which met the current test for a “therapeutic termination”, as opposed to 10,403 abortions for financial or social reasons which private clinics reported that year.

It is of interest to note that Victoria, which decriminalised abortion in 2008, reported 358 late-term abortions in 2012-13 (the latest year for which we have figures), exactly half of which were for foetal abnormality and half for “psycho-social” reasons.

The fact is that if the Pyne Bills are passed, Queensland public hospitals would have to do abortions for any reason, including late-term abortions for “psycho-social” reasons.

Former director of maternal and foetal medicine at the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, and now an obstetrician in private practice who performs mid-term abortions, Dr Carol Portmann, told the Health Committee inquiry into the first Pyne Bill that in the event of decriminalisation she expected the proportion of all abortions performed by public hospitals to rise from the current 2% to “20 to 25%” of the total.

Over time, Queensland Health would abandon its current “health culture” and replace it with a culture that abortion is “part of routine medical care”, according Dr Portmann.

Inevitably, the overall number of abortions would increase as a result of this free service, and due to the fact that whenever something is legalised, the incidence of it always rises, as the law plays a role in educating the community regarding moral values (think pokies and brothels).

Ms Lauren Martyn-Jones, who says she doesn’t agree with gender selection abortion, apparently concedes that the Pyne Bills would legalise this practice, but justifies this on the basis that “it already occurs in Queensland right now.”

The Cherish Life gendercide radio ad justifiably confronts people with the inconvenient truth that abortion “for any reason” means legalising the killing of unborn baby girls, just because they are female.

The price of endorsing decriminalisation of abortion is that one ends up supporting abortion for reasons that almost every Australian would find abhorrent, such as gender selection.

We know that gender selection abortions do occur in Australia, due to a demographic study using ABS data from 2003 to 2013 which was originally reported by SBS in 2015 showing “1,395 missing girls”. See http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3203013/Gender-selection-abortions-happening-Australia.html

Also, in 2013 Dr Mark Hobart of Melbourne faced disciplinary charges for refusing to refer a couple for a sex selection abortion in Victoria. See http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/opinion/doctor-risks-his-career-after-refusing-abortion-referral/news-story/a37067e66ed4f8d9a07ec9cb6fd28cf5

As to whether the state’s abortion laws meet community expectations, a comprehensive Galaxy poll in May 2016 found that 42% of Queensland voters thought the current law was “about right” and 11% thought it was “not restrictive enough” – making 53% who were opposed to making abortion laws more permissive. Furthermore, 85% of Queenslanders are opposed to abortion past 20 weeks of pregnancy, and 72% are opposed to abortion past 13 weeks. See What Queenslanders Really Think About Abortion.

For more information, please contact:

Julie Borger
President
Cherish Life Queensland
Email [email protected]
Mobile 0412 692 343

Chris Da Silva
Director of Communications and Marketing
Cherish Life Queensland
Email [email protected]
Mobile: 0433 775 429

Share

Neither Pyne Bill is fit to be passed in the Queensland Parliament

The committee report in to the second Pyne Bill, the Health (Abortion Law Reform) Amendment Bill 2016, has revealed that they are unable to agree on whether this bill should be passed by parliament or not.

This leaves both Bills unable to be recommended for passing by the parliament after the first Pyne Bill, Abortion Law Reform (Woman's Right to Choose) Amendment Bill 2016, received a unanimous recommendation from the committee report that it not be passed.

That the committee is hung on the second bill, it demonstrates that they have not taken in to consideration the unprecedented 1270+ submissions of which 83% were against the bill.

The bill is also in conflict with the Australian constitution.

Looking at the parliamentary committee submission of Professor Nicholas Aroney, he states “On the current approach of the High Court, there is little doubt that s 24(2)(c) of the Health (Abortion Law Reform) Amendment Bill, if enacted, would effectively burden the constitutionally-protected freedom.” (https://www.parliament.qld.gov.au/documents/committees/HCDSDFVPC/2016/18-HealthAbortion/submissions/1020.pdf p2-3)

Cherish Life has received independent legal advice from a constitutional law expert that the euphemistically named “protected area” provisions are in conflict with the Australian constitution. Even family members trying to dissuade someone from proceeding with an abortion would be at risk of arrest and prosecution. They would be criminalised by this bill.

In the Statement Of Reservations in the report appendix, three LNP MPs (Mark McArdle, Mark Robinson and Sid Cramp) have flagged the uncertainty in the final outcome of the bills when voted on in parliament. They state “Though Bills that become Acts of Parliament may end before a Court for interpretation a Parliament should not pass legislation that it knows may or will raise questions of interpretation. The role of the Parliament is therefore to strive is [sic] to pass cogent legislation that is drafted in clear and unambiguous language and not inconsistent with other legislation.”

The MPs conclude “The point is - has the legislation covering this very sensitive and emotional question been drafted in a manner that should be before a Parliament and is the process in which we are about to engage correct? We have a responsibility to pass clear and unambiguous legislation. We do not believe we are at that stage.”

Cherish Life Queensland president Julie Borger said “It is clear that neither of these bills are in a fit state to be passed by the parliament. They are extreme. They are a mess. They should either be withdrawn or voted down immediately.”

In addition to the submissions against the second Pyne Bill, there were also 31,735 signatures on the official parliamentary petition against the bill. This brought the total signatures against the two bills to 55,604.

On Saturday 11 February 2017 a crowd of almost 4,000 from the March for Life marched on parliament and filled the entire Speakers Corner precinct, protesting against the Pyne Bills. (see supplied pic attached)

The high level of public outcry over this bill also reflects the results of gold standard independent market research by Galaxy that drills down to the attitudes of the community (not the mere testing of a political slogan). Queenslanders are firmly against more permissive abortion laws.

Media contact:

Julie Borger
0412 692 343
[email protected]

Images available for publication:

March For Life 2017 crowd outside parliament house, taking up the entire area of Speakers Corner and George Street right back to the traffic lights - link to download full resolution image file
MarchForLife2017 crowd at Speakers Corner 1200px

Protesters, agaist the Pyne Bills, march along George Street to Speakers Corner outside Parliament. - link to download full resolution image fileMarchForLife2017 158 prolife protest 1200px

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Pro-life ad campaign launched to defeat abortion bills

Cherish Life Queensland has launched a multi-media advertising campaign to urge voters to contact their state MPs to ask them to vote against the abortion decriminalisation bills before Parliament.

The private member’s bills moved by Independent Cairns MP Rob Pyne last year will be debated on 1 March.

Newspaper advertisements were published today (Tuesday, 14 February) in The Courier-Mail, and four regional daily papers, Gold Coast Bulletin, Sunshine Coast Daily, Cairns Post and Daily Mercury in Mackay.

The ad alerted the public to the fact that the new laws have no effective time limits on abortion, no safeguards for women (such as requirements for independent counselling and a cooling-off period) and would allow abortion for any reason, even gender selection.

It also will be published in 10 local weekly newspapers in the Brisbane region over the next two weeks. A copy of the newspaper ad is here. (click for PDF version)

A two week radio campaign on stations in Brisbane, Gold Coast, Sunshine Coast, Mackay and Cairns also has commenced.

One radio ad explains that “this new law would allow the abortion of an entirely healthy baby of an entirely healthy woman” and says “it’s time to draw the line on abortion.”

Another radio ad on gender selection abortion says: “She’s a healthy baby, full of life and ready to take on the world. But it’s a world she’ll never see… Because she’s a girl. And some parents don’t want girls.”

Listen to the main radio advertisement. 

 

Cherish Life also has started letterboxing flyers and using targeted local online ads on Facebook to alert voters in 14 marginal state electorates about these extreme bills, asking them to tell their MPs to vote No.

An example of one of the local letterbox flyers is below:

letterbox flyer sample

Following is an example of one of the targeted local online ads on Facebook: 

Cherish Life president Julie Borger said MPs needed to be aware that their constituents would be watching very closely as to how they would vote on the two abortion bills before State Parliament.

“Queenslanders don’t want more abortions,” she said.

She said recent Galaxy research showed that there would be a potential average 6% swing against MPs who voted to legalise abortion. The poll showed 84% of Queenslanders believed abortion harms women’s health and 85% opposed late-term abortions past 20 weeks.

“Abortion is a real vote changer and electors will dispense with any party loyalty to remove MPs who would bring in these extreme laws. This will be a big issue in the run-up to the next election and Cherish Life will be campaigning hard to let electors know how their MPs voted,” Mrs Borger said.

“At the last election both major parties said they would not touch the abortion laws, yet both parties are now giving their MPs a conscience vote so they can go against their election promises. With trust in the political system waning, breaking such a major promise won’t go down well with Queensland voters.

“Cherish Life has been defending the right to life of the unborn in Queensland for more than 45 years and our members are prepared to fight very hard to stand up for those innocent unborn Queenslanders who can’t speak for themselves.”

For further information contact:

Chris Da Silva
Director of Marketing & Communications
Cherish Life Qld
Email [email protected]
Mobile: 0433 775 429

Julie Borger
President
Cherish Life Qld
Email [email protected]
Mobile 0412 692 343

 

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Women deserve better than abortion, Cherish Life tells parliamentary inquiry

Cherish Life Queensland representatives, research director Kara Thomas and vice-president Dr Donna Purcell, gave evidence at the Queensland Parliament Health Committee public hearings on 27 October into the second Pyne bill, the Health (Abortion Law Reform) Amendment Bill.

In her opening statement, Mrs Thomas argued that the most important consideration in this debate was “What are the unborn?”

“For we must answer this question before we as a society decide it is morally acceptable to destroy them as the answer to crisis pregnancy,” she stated.

Cherish Life research director Kara Thomas and vice-president Alan Baker outside the Parliamentary Annexe after the last hearing.

 

       Cherish Life research director Kara Thomas and
       vice-president Alan Baker outside the
       Parliamentary Annexe after the last hearing. 

“Ideas have consequences and the idea that the unborn child can be dehumanised as a non-person and excluded from the human family based on size, level of development, location or age, is a dangerous idea. For we cannot diminish the value of one category of human life - the unborn - without diminishing the value of all human life,” she said.

The second Pyne bill supports abortion on demand to 24 weeks’ gestation and beyond that time for essentially any reason with the agreement of two doctors. The doctors can both be abortionists, the second doctor does not even have to see the patient and there is no penalty if a second opinion is not sought.

The Committee report into the first bill stated: “No women wants an abortion.”

“Yet this second bill does not address any of the recommendations designed to provide women real choice. Instead it continues to advocate for expanded access to one choice. Accepting such a premise amounts to state-sanctioned coercion, veiled in liberty rhetoric.

“The last thing women need is more permissive abortion laws, as Mr Pyne is proposing. Instead, they need whatever protection the current law can provide, as well as full and accurate information, real support and safeguards such as independent counselling and cooling-off periods,” Mrs Thomas said. “Women deserve better than abortion.

“The bill before the committee would allow for the dismemberment, lethal injection or cranial decompression (partial birth abortion) of babies the same age as those in our Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU). This barbarism is being considered as the principal solution to crisis pregnancy.Babies deserve better than abortion.

“Denying the unborn the status of personhood is a tool, that has been used throughout history by the strong to take away the rights of the weak. Abortion discriminates against the unborn based on age, size and location.”

Mrs Thomas reminded the committee of a statement made by Martin Luther King, who fought for the right of all human beings to be treated equally: “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” Our society deserves better than abortion, she said.

The Committee has received a combined total of more than 2,500 submissions, with the vast majority opposed to more permissive abortion laws. Mrs Thomas said this was significant considering a recent domestic violence Queensland parliament inquiry received only 20 submissions.

Additionally, a petition against the first Pyne bill, which would totally decriminalise abortion on demand through all nine months of pregnancy, received more than 23,000 signatures. A current petition against the second bill has more than 12,000 signatures and growing.

“Clearly, Queenslanders are not supportive of this irresponsible abortion reform that is lethal to the unborn, harmful for women and destructive to our community,” Mrs Thomas said.

 

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‘Just another choice’ – aborting for Down syndrome

Reading the recent news surrounding the new non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) procedure, a simple blood test in the first trimester of pregnancy that can detect Down syndrome with 99% accuracy, I came across a 2013 news.com.au article titled “Is this the beginning of the end for Down syndrome?”

It included a statement by geneticist Professor Jane Halliday that stopped me in my tracks. In regard to prenatal testing, she called it “just another choice”.

This statement was in response to a claim by an organisation in New Zealand called Saving Down Syndrome, who believe this is a form of eugenics, a breeding out of “inferior” humans.

“Just another choice” is a powerful statement. It suggests that all choices are equal, but is this really true or should it matter what we choose and what the consequences are of those choices, for ourselves, for others and for the social fabric of our society?

People do indeed make all sorts of choices every day. Trivial choices like what we choose to eat for lunch, what we choose to wear, whether we choose to brush our teeth. All of which have little impact on another human being.

People can choose to care for or neglect their kids, to love or abuse their spouse, to obey the law or to break it. But they are not equally good. Such choices powerfully demonstrate how one person’s choice can lead to the harm or destruction of another.

Not all choices are equal, so it does matter what is being chosen!

While Halliday claims people make all kinds of choices in life and therefore prenatal testing is just another choice, this isn’t true. Terminating a human being because they happen to have a disability is not just. If this is permissible, why not allow aborting babies because they are the wrong gender?

Given NIPT can accurately predict gender as well as Down syndrome, Professor Halliday would be unlikely to share the concerns of Queensland fertility doctor and gynaecologist Dr David Molloy who said there was a “real ethical risk” that expectant parents who are given the NIPT procedure might terminate their unborn children if they were not happy with the gender.

Gender selection abortion and infanticide is due to many cultures believing women are “inferior” to men.

The choice to terminate the unborn who happen to be female has resulted in the world missing 200 million women, close to 1,500 of them from Australia according to a 2015 SBS investigation.

Pre-natal testing is resulting in unborn children who happen to have Down syndrome being screened out of existence because they are believed to be, while many may not say it, “inferior” to able people. How many people with Down syndrome is the world missing?

Is eliminating people with Down syndrome through prenatal testing a moral good that will somehow make the world a better place by decreasing the perceived work and expense of those who are able?

The world is not better by eliminating diversity, by reducing the need to serve others, or by being obsessed with our own personal wants. Choices have consequences and it matters how we live and what choices we make individually and collectively.

A world without Down syndrome would not be a better or more moral world. History clearly shows that when cultures devalue any group of people, based on gender, race, religion or disability, the result is destruction, not liberation.

Kara Thomas is Director of Research, Policy and Advocacy at Cherish Life Queensland.

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